December 2013

Happy New Year to all our readers. We hope you have a prosperous and peaceful 2014.

A British Airways airplane carrying 202 people collided an office building while taxiing for take off at Johannesburg’s OR Tambo International Airport on Sunday, civil aviation authorities reported. Its right wing struck the building.

The 747-400 was preparing to fly to London Heathrow Airport and apparently took a taxiway that was not wide enough for its wingspan, said a South African Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) spokeswoman.

“This resulted in the aircraft’s right-hand wing impacting the office building,”.

The control tower “told them to take one taxiway and they took another one. They took a wrong one,” said Gwebu.

Four people inside the building were injured, but the 185 passengers and 17 crew on board were unharmed during the late-night accident, according to the CAA.

No further information on the injured was immediately available.

An airport spokeswoman confirmed the incident.

A photo taken by a passenger from the cabin showed the aircraft’s giant wing wedged into a quarter of the length of the small building.

Harriet Tolputt, head of media for international humanitarian organisation Oxfam, posted the pictures to Twitter.

“BA plane crashes into building at J Burg airport. No one injured only the pilot’s pride,” she posted, complaining that first-class passengers were evacuated before the rest.

The stuck plane had still not been able to take off by Monday morning. The CAA did not say what plans had been made for the stranded passengers.

A British Airways airplane carrying 202 people collided an office building while taxiing for take off at Johannesburg’s OR Tambo International Airport on Sunday, civil aviation authorities reported. Its right wing struck the building.

The 747-400 was preparing to fly to London Heathrow Airport and apparently took a taxiway that was not wide enough for its wingspan, said a South African Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) spokeswoman.

“This resulted in the aircraft’s right-hand wing impacting the office building,”.

The control tower “told them to take one taxiway and they took another one. They took a wrong one.”

The four people inside were inside the building, but no passengers or crew aboard the plane were injured.

No further information on the injured was immediately available.

A photo taken by a passenger from the cabin showed the aircraft’s giant wing wedged into a quarter of the length of the small building.

Harriet Tolputt, head of media for international humanitarian organisation Oxfam, posted the pictures to Twitter.

“BA plane crashes into building at J Burg airport. No one injured only the pilot’s pride,” she posted, complaining that first-class passengers were evacuated before the rest.

The Airports Commission this morning published an interim report into possible options to expand UK airport capacity

Three options were shorlisted, with the Boris Island being also mentioned as receiving further consideration. The final report is expected in 2015.

The three short-listed options (two of which relate to Heathrow) adding a third runway at Heathrow, lengthening an existing runway at Heathrow, and a new runway at Gatwick.

Stansted and Birmingham appear to have been ruled out at this stage, although they may be in contention in the more distant future.

Sir Howard Davies, said that the Commission’s analysis showed one net additional runway was needed by 2030.
He added that the capacity challenge is not yet critical, but it will become so if no action is taken soon.

The Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin made a statement to the House of Commons expressing his approval of the Airport Commission recommendations, stating the report “offers a clear recommendation that there is a need for a new runway capacity” in the medium term “to support continued competitiveness and prosperity”.

British Airways is extending the number of routes operated by its new aircraft and increasing frequencies on some routes for summer 2014 (from March 30).

 

British Airways now has three A380s and four 787s. Thanks to the arrival of the new aircraft into the fleet, the airline is able to confirm that the A380 and 787 will operate between London and the following destinations in Summer 14:

 

• The A380 will begin services to Washington from September 1, 2014. The aircraft is already flying to Los Angeles and Hong Kong and will start services to Johannesburg in February 2014.

 

• The 787s will next launch on services to:

 

• Hyderabad from 30 March

 

• Chengdu from 5 May

 

• Philadelphia from 5 June

 

• Calgary from 5 July

 

 The 787 is already flying between London and Toronto and New York Newark and will operate services to/from Austin when the route launches on 3 March 2014.

 

 Additional frequencies:

 

• The airline will increase the number of flights to/from Chengdu from three to five a week (also from 5 May).

 

• From 6 May, Tokyo Haneda will move from five-a-week to daily flights. The Haneda flights will also be re-timed to a more convenient 8.50am departure from Haneda (currently 6.35am).

 

• Mexico City will also benefit from an increase from five to six services a week from April 27.

 

• Cape Town will gain an extra three Boeing 777-200ER flights a week through South Africa’s cooler winter season (the Northern Hemisphere’s summer) taking it from a daily service to 10 flights a week and accommodating an additional 219 customers in four cabins.

 

 These flights are available for sale.

 

British Airways says it is investing more than £5bn in new aircraft, smarter cabins, elegant lounges, and new technologies to make life more comfortable in the air and on the ground.

 

British Airways also says it is the first airline in the UK to fly the A380 and the first in Europe to fly both the A380 and 787. Customers on these aircraft are able to enjoy the new cabins and seats that have proved so popular on the airline’s 777-300Ers.

 

Both aircraft types make major environmental advances and contribute toward the airline’s ambitious targets for noise and carbon reduction.